Tips

Herbal Supplements
Pregnancy Exercise
Pain Management
My Favorite Things

Aryn’s Herbal Supplement Regimen
*The majority of these products are not regulated by the FDA. Do not use any of these products or home remedies without your midwives approval.

Prenatal Vitamins: These are specially formulated multivitamins that make up for any nutritional deficiencies in the mother’s diet. Their folic acid, iron, and calcium content are especially important.
Regimen
: Need to be taken before, during and after pregnancy (throughout nursing)

Red Raspberry Leaf: Many midwives report that red raspberry leaf aids in focusing the pre-labor contractions that help a woman’s uterus to prepare for delivery.
Regimen: Take 1 capsule every day from 31-33 weeks, take 2 capsules per day from 34-36 weeks, take 3 capsules per day from 37-38 weeks, take 4 capsules per day from 39 weeks until delivery.

Evening Primrose Oil: Evening primrose oil acts as a prostaglandin, which ripens and softens the cervix. The ripening of the cervix can help the baby’s head engage deeper into the pelvis, which can help with dilation.
Regimen:
take one capsule per day from 36 weeks until delivery

Omega-3 (Fish Oil): Plays a large role in the development and growth of the baby when it is in the uterus. Omega 3 helps to build the brain, form the retinas, and develop the nervous system. Omega 3 is also necessary for the mother’s own health and wellbeing. Omega 3 helps to reduce her chances of developing preeclampsia, reduce her risk for postpartum depression, and minimize the chance of preterm labor.
Regimen:
take one capsule per day before, during and after pregnancy

Homeopathic Trio: This was a specific combination of homeopathics that my midwife recommends to all her clients towards the end of their pregnancy. It rotates between:
Arnica: encourages healing, controls bleeding, reduces swelling and bruising
Cimicifuga: Strengthens uterus, helps contractions be more efficient
Caulophyllum: Produces productive contractions. Reduces stiffness and pain in joints and strengthens the uterus.
Regimen: Take two pellets of only one remedy under tongue once a day, rotating remedy every day from 35 weeks until delivery.

Probiotics: Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host
Regimen: One capsule per day with food

What you can take when you can’t take drugs…
Most of these products can be found in health food stores (like Sprouts)

  • for sleeplessness: Melatonin
  • for a urinary tract infection: Kidney activator
  • for a colds and allergies: ALJ, Echinacea
  • for nausea: Nux Vomica
  • for diarrhea: Bentonite (mixed w/juice)
  • for constipation: apple cider vinegar (2 tbs/day)
  • for heartburn: papaya tablets

Aryn’s Exercises

Prenatal Yoga:
From BabyCenter.com

“Prenatal yoga classes are more popular than ever. When paired with a cardiovascular exercise such as walking, yoga can be an ideal way to stay in shape during your pregnancy. This age-old practice keeps you limber, tones your muscles, and improves your balance and circulation, with little, if any, impact on your joints.

Yoga is also beneficial because it helps you learn to breathe deeply and relax, which will come in handy as you face the physical demands of labor, birth, and motherhood. In fact, one of the first things you learn in a yoga class is how to breathe fully. The breathing technique known as ujjayi requires you to take in air slowly through your nose, filling your lungs, and exhale completely until your stomach compresses.

Learning how to do ujjayi breathing primes you for labor and childbirth by training you to stay calm when you need it most. When you’re in pain or afraid, your body produces adrenalin and may produce less oxytocin, a hormone that makes labor progress. A regular yoga practice will help you fight the urge to tighten up when you feel pain, and show you how to relax instead.

Along these same lines, according to a report in the April 2009 issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter, rigorous studies have found scientific proof that yoga helps the body deal with stress by slowing heart and breathing rates and lowering blood pressure — which can benefit new moms after the baby’s born, too.

The benefits of yoga aren’t limited to your physical well-being. “Taking a prenatal yoga class is a great way to meet other pregnant women — to become part of a community,” says Cynthea Denise, a registered nurse and prenatal yoga instructor in Oakland, California. Being in a positive, supportive environment with others like you can give you a regular emotional boost and keep you motivated to continue exercising.”

Water Aerobics:
From PregnancyWeekly

If you are searching for a safe, low-impact exercise program you can follow all nine months, you might try heading to your local swimming pool. Swimming, water jogging, and aqua aerobics are some of the best exercises to perform while pregnant, and many gyms and pools now offer a variety of classes such as basic aerobics, water boxing, and aqua step.

Exercising in water is ideal for pregnant women because the water’s buoyancy requires you to support only 50 percent of your body weight, it reduces the risk of stress-related injuries, and the compression of the water is soothing on joints and muscles that are stressed by the added bulk of your pregnancy. The water’s temperature also keeps you from overheating during your workout.

Walking
From BabyCenter
Walking is one of the best cardiovascular exercises for pregnant women because it keeps you fit without jarring your knees and ankles. It’s also a safe activity to continue throughout all nine months of pregnancy and one of the easier ways to start exercising if you haven’t previously been active.

If you’ve been walking, keep it up. If you were fairly inactive before you got pregnant, start with a slow walk and build up to brisk 20- to 30-minute jaunts. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, you can safely do moderate exercise for 30 minutes or more most days of the week, provided you’ve gotten the go-ahead from your doctor or midwife.

Pain Management Techniques

HypnoBabies
In other cultures, childbirth is regarded as a natural, normal event in a woman’s life. The birthing women are given support from other women, and children are often present to witness the event. In this way, birth is celebrated and honored. Young girls then grow up with the belief system that birth is a positive event and their expectations of childbirth reflect this attitude. As a result, their births are similar to their predecessors; without pain and fear. They have a positive expectation of childbirth. In our culture, it is very much the opposite. For many generations we have been told that delivering a baby will be untold hours of painfully agonizing work, to be faced with fear and trepidation. We have heard stories from well-meaning friends and family that send shivers up our spines, and so the legacy continues. We experience pain in childbirth, in part because we very much expect to!

In Hypnobabies classes, you are taught to surround yourself with only positive people and messages, to create a positive view of childbirth and the expectation that your birthing with be a beautiful, peaceful experience. Hypnobabies’ Fear Clearing Sessions are integral to this process, as they allow you to address fears, work through possible solutions and then release them. Fear in labor can create tension, which creates pain, then more fear, and the cycle continues. Fear and anxiety can also create adrenaline production in the body, causing the labor to become dysfunctional, a common reason for Cesarean Section surgery. Freedom from fear can make a significant difference in the birthing experience.

Chiropractic
from Lifetime Family Wellness Center
At conception, mom’s body releases a hormone called “relaxin”.  This hormone loosens all of mom’s joints, ligaments and muscles to accommodate the precious new life growing inside of her.  Also, throughout the pregnancy mom’s weight and center of gravity will drastically change.  These are just some of the reasons why chiropractic care is so important during this time.  Mom needs to make sure that everything is in the right position to allow maximum room for baby to move and position him or herself correctly.  After all, movement helps baby’s brain development and baby’s positioning not only affects mom’s comfort but also her labor and birth.  Making sure everything in mom’s body is positioned correctly will also help minimize mom’s chances of injuring herself.

These are a few of my favorite things…(for pregnancy and baby!)

Pajama Jeans

Snoogle Body Pillow

Preggie Pop Drops

many thanks to super mom Jessalyn Hutto for recommending the following…

FuzziBunz Cloth Diapers

WashPod (Baby Tub)

Sophie (teething giraffe)

Are you overwhelmed trying to compile a baby registry? Don’t know bumbo from boppy? Shoot me an email and I will be happy to help give you some tips and registry suggestions!


One Response to Tips

  1. Leigh says:

    Newman’s Own Ginger Mints were wonderful for the early pregnancy nausea. Strong ginger taste (no mint) and in a tin like Altoids so they are easy to carry around.

    I am doing water aerobics this time and loving it. I found a general class at our local Y that works great for me. It has helped my lower back pain (from sleeping on my side) and the water supporting my belly makes it the most comfortable part of my day. Or it does until the little one decides to participate in the bicycles.

    Get a prenatal massage. It just feels wonderful. Find someone with some training as there are a few things they need to watch out for.

    Knickernappies nursing pads. Some people never leak, some do for a few weeks and some like me need nursing pads for a year. These ones are reusable with super soft fleece next to the skin that feels dry, hemp in the middle for lots of absorption and waterproof backing to keep your shirt dry.

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